Bone Research Society

Bringing basic and clinical researchers together since 1950

Gallery

Osteoclast resoprtion #4

By kind permission of Tim Arnett (t.arnett@ucl.ac.uk) & Javier Manzano, UCL.

Scanning electron micrograph of activated osteoclast and resorption pit

Osteoclast resorption #3

By kind permission of Tim Arnett (t.arnett@ucl.ac.uk) & Javier Manzano, UCL.

Scanning electron micrograph of activated osteoclast and resorption pit

Osteoclast resorption #2

By kind permission of Tim Arnett (t.arnett@ucl.ac.uk) & Javier Manzano, UCL

Scanning electron micrograph of activated osteoclast and resorption pits.

Osteoclast resorption

By kind permission of Tim Arnett (t.arnett@ucl.ac.uk) & Javier Manzano, UCL

Scanning electron micrograph of activated osteoclast and resorption pit.

Bone formation by cultured osteoblasts

By kind permission of Tim Arnett, University College London (t.arnett@ucl.ac.uk)

Backscatter SEM of Trabecular Bone

Duncan Bassett, Alan Boyde & Graham Williams

Backscattered electron scanning electron microscope image showing osteoclast resorption of trabecular bone (roughened surfaces).
The osteocyte lacunae and canaliculi are also seen within the trabeculae.

Structure under resorbing osteoclast

Dr Gudrun Stenbeck, Brunel

Human Osteoclast confocal

Dr Gudrun Stenbeck, Brunel

Confocal image of human osteoclast culture on bone showing resorption areas enclosed by actin (red). Cells are stained for osteoclast cell surface marker, integrin alphavbeta3 (green).

Osteoclast confocal

Dr Gudrun Stenbeck, Brunel

3D reconstruction of confocal image of a resorbing osteoclast on dentine revealing the endocytotic organelles of the cell

Osteocytes

Kevin Mackenzie, Microscopy Facility University of Aberdeen.

Bone core

Kevin Mackenzie, Microscopy Facility University of Aberdeen.

Osteoclast microtubules 2

Dr Fraser Coxon, University of Aberdeen

Osteoclast microtubules

Dr Fraser Coxon, University of Aberdeen

Resorbing Osteoclast In Vitro 3D

Dr Fraser Coxon, University of Aberdeen

Resorbing Osteoclast In Vitro

Dr Fraser Coxon, University of Aberdeen

Human Osteoclasts

Dr Alison Gartland, The University of Sheffield

Human osteoclasts on ivory

Osteoporotic Bone

By kind permission of Alan Boyde

Low power scanning electron microscope image, showing osteoporotic architecture in the fourth lumbar vertebra of an 89 year old woman (x20). The bone is heavily eroded in places by the action of osteoclasts and consists mainly of thin, fragile struts.

Normal Bone

By kind permission of Alan Boyde

Low power scanning electron microscope images, showing normal bone architecture in the third lumbar vertebra of a 30 year old woman (x20). Strong, interconnected plates of bone are visible.

Normal Bone

By kind permission of Alan Boyde

Very low power scanning electron microscope image, showing normal bone architecture in the fourth lumbar vertebra of an 41 year year old man (x8). A regular pattern of interconnected plates and thick struts of bone can be seen.

Osteoclast

By kind permission of Tim Arnett

Scanning electron micrograph showing osteoclast resorbing bone.

Osteoclast

By kind permission of Alan Boyde

Breakfast, lunch and dinner for an osteoclast!

Osteocytes - Human Bone

By kind permission of Tim Arnett

Tooth Eruption

By kind permission of Tim Arnett

Eruption of adult tooth, cat jaw. H & E stained preparation. Field view 1.5 mm.

Human osteoclast & resorption trails #1

By kind permission of Tim Arnett

Human osteoclast & resorption trails #2

By kind permission of Tim Arnett

Normal Bone

By kind permission of Tim Arnett, University College London (t.arnett@ucl.ac.uk)

Image of normal bone architecture in the 3rd lumbar vertebra of a 30 year old woman.

Osteoporotic Bone

By kind permission of Tim Arnett, University College London (t.arnett@ucl.ac.uk)

Architecture in the 3rd lumbar vertebra of a 71 year old woman. Note trabecular bone element eroded by osteoclasts.

Osteoporotic Bone

By kind permission of Tim Arnett, University College London (t.arnett@ucl.ac.uk)

Architecture in the 3rd lumbar vertebra of a 71 year old woman. Note trabecular bone element perforated by osteoclasts.

Human bone marrow stromal cells

By kind permission of Bram Sengers and Richard Oreffo

Human bone marrow stromal cells spreading on trabecular bone.

Osteoporotic bone architecture

By kind permission of Tim Arnett, University College London (t.arnett@ucl.ac.uk)

Low-power scanning electron micrograph of osteoporotic bone architecture in the 3rd lumbar vertebra of a 71 yr old woman. Marrow and other cells have been removed removed to reveal eroded bone elements. Field width = 1.4 mm.

Human bone marrow stromal cells

By kind permission of Bram Sengers and Richard Oreffo

Human bone marrow stromal cells spreading on trabecular bone.

Osteoporotic bone architecture

By kind permission of Tim Arnett.

Low-power image of osteoporitic bone architecture.

Comparison of normal and osteoporotic bone architecture

© Tim Arnett, University College London (t.arnett@ucl.ac.uk)

(3rd lumbar vertebrae) Marrow and other cells have been removed. Extensive pitting caused by osteoclasts in the osteoporotic bone (lower panel)

Section of ichthyosaur vertebrae and ribs

© Tim Arnett, University College London (t.arnett@ucl.ac.uk)

Section of ichthyosaur vertebrae and ribs in pyrite nodule. Seatown, Dorset, UK (190 myr). Trabecular bone structure is particularly well preserved in ribs.

Normal human vertebral bone structure

© Tim Arnett, University College London (t.arnett@ucl.ac.uk)

Scanning Electron Microscopy of osteoporotic bone

© Tim Arnett, University College London (t.arnett@ucl.ac.uk)

Scanning Electron Microscopy of osteoporotic bone

© Tim Arnett, University College London (t.arnett@ucl.ac.uk)